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Articles Index - page 2

Housing Allowance Fraud
A case in which several sailors face charges for arranging sham marriages to foreign women to boost their military housing allowances sends an important message to all servicemembers: "You're putting in a claim for money that you are not entitled to, and that is a crime. And if you commit a crime, you can expect to be held accountable for it."

Upgrading Your Military Discharge
This form is used to request upgrade of a military discharge from the appropriate discharge review board.

Military Employment/Reemployment Rights
he Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) was signed on October 13, 1994. The act provides employment and reemployment rights for individuals who leave their jobs due to military service, whether such service is active duty, the Reserves, or the National Guard.

U.S. Military Frequently Asked Questions
Frequently Asked Questions about U.S. Military Law (Justice) and Legislation Issues.

U.S. Military Desertion Rates
Desertion rates for the U.S. Military services from Fiscal Year 1997 to Fiscal Year 2004

CSI -- The Military Way
Television today is inundated with shows on forensic science. Programs like CSI and Dr. G., Medical Examiner have piqued the public’s interest in how forensic experts find answers to questions surrounding a death. But what happens if that death takes place on a military base? Who has authority to investigate?

Miliary Justice 101
All about the United States Military Justice System, including information on court martials, article 15s, rights of the accused, administrative demotions, discharges, counselings, reprimands, and more.

Counselings, Admonitions, Reprimands, and Additional Training
In addition to the more serious discipline tools under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, commanders and supervisors have a diverse set of administrative tools to assist them in correcting inappropriate behavior. Counseling, admonitions, reprimands, and extra training are tools that, while they derive their status and authority from the unit commander, are usually delegated down the chain to the supervisory level.

United States Military Code of Conduct
The Code of Conduct (CoC) is the legal guide for the behavior of military members who are captured by hostile forces. The Code of Conduct, in six brief Articles, addresses those situations and decision areas that, to some degree, all military personnel could encounter.

United States Military Code of Conduct
The Code of Conduct (CoC) is the legal guide for the behavior of military members who are captured by hostile forces. The Code of Conduct, in six brief Articles, addresses those situations and decision areas that, to some degree, all military personnel could encounter.

United States Military Code of Conduct
The Code of Conduct (CoC) is the legal guide for the behavior of military members who are captured by hostile forces. The Code of Conduct, in six brief Articles, addresses those situations and decision areas that, to some degree, all military personnel could encounter.

United States Military Code of Conduct
The Code of Conduct (CoC) is the legal guide for the behavior of military members who are captured by hostile forces. The Code of Conduct, in six brief Articles, addresses those situations and decision areas that, to some degree, all military personnel could encounter.

United States Military Code of Conduct
The Code of Conduct (CoC) is the legal guide for the behavior of military members who are captured by hostile forces. The Code of Conduct, in six brief Articles, addresses those situations and decision areas that, to some degree, all military personnel could encounter.

United States Military Code of Conduct
The Code of Conduct (CoC) is the legal guide for the behavior of military members who are captured by hostile forces. The Code of Conduct, in six brief Articles, addresses those situations and decision areas that, to some degree, all military personnel could encounter.

Nonjudicial Punishment (Article 15)
Nonjudicial punishment (NJP) refers to certain limited punishments which can be awarded for minor disciplinary offenses by a commanding officer or officer in charge to members of his/her command. In the Navy and Coast Guard, nonjudicial punishment proceedings are referred to as "captain's mast" or simply "mast." In the Marine Corps, the process is called "office hours," and in the Army and Air Force, it is referred to as "Article 15."

Nonjudicial Punishment (Article 15)
Nonjudicial punishment (NJP) refers to certain limited punishments which can be awarded for minor disciplinary offenses by a commanding officer or officer in charge to members of his/her command. In the Navy and Coast Guard, nonjudicial punishment proceedings are referred to as "captain's mast" or simply "mast." In the Marine Corps, the process is called "office hours," and in the Army and Air Force, it is referred to as "Article 15."

Nonjudicial Punishment (Article 15)
Nonjudicial punishment (NJP) refers to certain limited punishments which can be awarded for minor disciplinary offenses by a commanding officer or officer in charge to members of his/her command. In the Navy and Coast Guard, nonjudicial punishment proceedings are referred to as "captain's mast" or simply "mast." In the Marine Corps, the process is called "office hours," and in the Army and Air Force, it is referred to as "Article 15."

Nonjudicial Punishment (Article 15)
Nonjudicial punishment (NJP) refers to certain limited punishments which can be awarded for minor disciplinary offenses by a commanding officer or officer in charge to members of his/her command. In the Navy and Coast Guard, nonjudicial punishment proceedings are referred to as "captain's mast" or simply "mast." In the Marine Corps, the process is called "office hours," and in the Army and Air Force, it is referred to as "Article 15."

Nonjudicial Punishment (Article 15)
Nonjudicial punishment (NJP) refers to certain limited punishments which can be awarded for minor disciplinary offenses by a commanding officer or officer in charge to members of his/her command. In the Navy and Coast Guard, nonjudicial punishment proceedings are referred to as "captain's mast" or simply "mast." In the Marine Corps, the process is called "office hours," and in the Army and Air Force, it is referred to as "Article 15."

Nonjudicial Punishment (Article 15)
Nonjudicial punishment (NJP) refers to certain limited punishments which can be awarded for minor disciplinary offenses by a commanding officer or officer in charge to members of his/her command. In the Navy and Coast Guard, nonjudicial punishment proceedings are referred to as "captain's mast" or simply "mast." In the Marine Corps, the process is called "office hours," and in the Army and Air Force, it is referred to as "Article 15."

Nonjudicial Punishment (Article 15)
In two cases, the Court of Military Appeals has considered the propriety of the imposition of Nonjudicial Punishment (Article 15) for offenses which have already been litigated (at least to some degree) before a court-martial.

Fraternization
Multi-part feature article about the fraternization policies of the United States Military. Feature discusses military fraternization polices and law in general, and specific policies of the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.

Military Protective (Restraining) Orders
In the civilian justice system, a restraining order or protective order is issued by a judge when a party petitions the court for protection from another individual. The United States Military Justice System has its own version of restraining orders, more commonly referred to as military protective orders, but which are officially conditions on liberty.

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