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MEPS at a Glance

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  • Applicant: Stand straight, then squat sharply several times, stop in squatting position, and then duck walk five steps forward, heel toe sequence; turn and duck walk back five steps to original position.
    • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Integrity of knees and hip joints b. Lateral patellar motion c. Hesitancy d. Balance
  • Applicant: In squatting position, one at a time drop on knees, with both knees hitting the floor simultaneously, and then walk on knees five steps and stop.
    • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Simultaneous drop b. Pain c. Hesitancy d. Apprehension
    • Applicant: At kneeling position, tuck toes under and one at a time raise to standing position in one smooth motion, without touching the floor with hands.
      • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Coordination b. Balance c. Quadriceps strength d. Unilateral weakness
      • Applicant: Flex one leg to the rear, grasp the ankle with ipsilateral hand, and plantar flex the foot.
        • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Plantar scars, plantar warts, and other abnormalities b. Balance
        • Applicant: Repeat maneuver, above with opposite foot.
        • Applicant: With elbows against body, flex elbows to right angles, palms up, extend and spread the fingers.
          • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Forearm supination b. Palms and fingers for scars, contracture, symmetry, missing fingers and parts
          • Applicant: With palms up, repeatedly flex and extend fingers, make a fist.
            • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Mobility and range of motion of digits b. Ability to make a fist
            • Applicant: Turn palms down and extend fingers, with elbows remaining at right angles and against the body.
              • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Forearm pronation b. Scars, contracture, symmetry, missing fingers
              • Applicant: Turn palm up and touch each finger in turn to the thumb, continue until told to stop.
                • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Mobility and range of digits b. Coordination
                • Applicant: Turn palms down, fingers extended, and repeatedly flex and extend hands at the wrists. Repeat until told to stop.
                  • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Range of motion of wrists b. Pain and apprehension
                  • Applicant: Turn palms down, fingers extended, flex hands at the wrist rapidly and ulnarly. Repeat until told to stop.
                    • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Wrist range of motion b. Pain, apprehension, and other abnormalities
                    • Applicant: Walk briskly, one by one, in straight line toward the examiner, stop in front of the examiner, turn, and walk away from the examiner.
                      • Physician: Observes each examine for: a. Gait abnormalities b. Limp c. Other postural abnormalities As part of the medical examination, you will also be personally interviewed by a physician. If, based on your medical history, the physician requires a rectal, or pelvic examination, it will be done at this time, in private.

                        A quick caution here: The MEPS physician's job is to determine your medical qualifications for military duty. He/she is not your family physician, and is not there to counsel you about your medical concerns. While you MUST be entirely honest when you complete the medical questionnaire and when you answer the physician's questions, it is not wise to volunteer information that isn't asked. I know a female recruit who had a complete medical physical two months prior to going to MEPS. She passed with flying colors. Absolutely the picture of perfect health. One of the things that concerned her was her irregular periods. Her family doctor had told her that nothing was wrong with her, and that irregular periods were common in girls who were physically active. While at MEPS, she decided to use the opportunity to get a "second opinion." She asked the MEPS medical physician about it. She was temporarily disqualified and sent back home until she could obtain a complete copy of the physical performed by the family physician, as well as a statement from the physician to state that her irregular periods were not a result of any underlying medical conditions.

                        The MEPS physician will use the results of your medical examination to determine whether or not you are medically qualified for military service, according to published Department of Defense Medical Standards.

                        If you have a medical disqualification that could be waived, the MEPS Medical Profile Officer will make a recommendation as to whether or not the military service should approve a waiver. In making this recommendation, the MPO will take the following factors into consideration:

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